Supporting Our Veterans

Experience and Results Like No Other

Freedom isn’t free, and the men and women who have served in the Armed Forces are the ones who bought us the freedoms and way of life we enjoy everyday—sometimes at a very high price, even the ultimate price. John Kasich shares the gratitude all Americans feel to our veterans and has worked to make sure that gratitude is expressed by giving veterans the support they need, including support to get a job as they transition from the battlefront to the home front.

The same kinds of policies that John Kasich has deployed successfully in Ohio to support veterans will be a model for the veterans policies he pursues as president. A particular focus will be health care, where he supports improving the current system as well as giving veterans new flexibilities and options to eliminate delays for needed care.

Prioritizing Veterans as a Ready Workforce: Veterans have advanced training and experience in many of the skills that Ohio job creators are seeking.  Reforms Gov. Kasich pursued in 2014 made it easier for veterans to transfer their skills to receive licensure credit so they can quickly begin applying their skills in good-paying jobs that support their families, job creators and their communities. Further, Ohio’s state licensing boards and commissions have adopted consistent military definitions and made changes to their applications and policies to make certain that veterans and spouses are identified and prioritized.

VeteransHallofFame2013-2Providing Property-Tax Relief to Disabled Veterans: Ohio doubled the homestead exemption for veterans with full service-related disabilities to make sure they are able to stay in their homes and better manage property tax bills.

Creating an Online Career Center for Veterans: Ohio created OhioMeansVeteranJobs.com—an online resource offering veterans a host of services to help them get a job.  The website has a “military skills translator” that helps map military experience to job skills to build a resume from military service.  And, the site matches military titles to applicable state licensing and occupational certification boards.  For businesses looking for qualified workers, Ohio created the Veterans Business Support Center to assist employers in locating qualified veteran candidates for job openings. We have prioritized veteran resumes on OhioMeansJobs.com allowing employers to review veteran resumes first.

Giving Veterans College Credit for Their Military Training and Experience:  Veterans who work toward a college degree deserve credit for the military training, experience and coursework they’ve received in the service.  Ohio now requires its higher education system to develop a set of standards and procedures for granting college credit for military experience.  The Military Transfer Assurance Guide provides a baseline of standards, procedures and tools for granting college credit for military experience for any public college and university providing more consistent services across our system. State law ensures that Ohio’s public colleges and universities cannot charge for evaluation, transcription and application of college credit for military experience.

20140602-8642Helping Ohio Veterans Make the Transition to College:  When reentering civilian life as a college student, veterans often struggle to learn of their options and the many opportunities available on a college campus.  Ohio took steps to ensure that colleges and universities in Ohio have veteran offices or specifically assigned counselors to support transitioning veterans.  In addition, veterans and active military members are now provided priority course registration at our public institutions ensuring they have access to the classes they need to succeed and thrive in civilian life.

Converted Veterans from Medicaid to the Veterans Benefits They Earned. Since June 2015, the Ohio Department of Veterans Services (DVS) has made contact with more than 6,000 Ohio veterans who requested information about Medicaid coverage. Of these veterans, nearly 75 percent were not receiving federal Veterans Administration (VA) benefits. DVS referred these veterans to county veterans’ service offices for direct assistance in applying for the VA benefits they earned, instead of going on Medicaid.